Archive for the ‘Rest’ Category

Emotions, the Workplace & Training

February 12, 2019

Yesterday I was asked to resign from a casual job that while I enjoyed working in, the lack of organisation & the hours didn’t suit me so well.  I wasn’t too concerned about being pressured into resigning, but it still had me spinning as it was unexpected. I know that I did everything I could to do a good job & see that on some level I will be missed. But I am also one of those fortunate people who could resign. I didn’t need to be there, and my lifestyle wasn’t dependent on the hours I worked or the money I got paid. I enjoyed being there, doing work, having a bit of structure to my life, that pushed my hand to a very structured training schedule (Which was working very well). But it did make me think of all the women I know (young women) who work jobs were they get bullied or treated inappropriately & cannot leave because they need those hours to put a roof over their head,  food on the table & fuel in their car, there may have even been some within this company.

Run Step Count

Although the more I think about it,  the type of people I worked with & the environment, I should have realised that my time with this company was going to be limited. My desire to do a good job didn’t extend to dealing with office politics, conforming to an employee level on duty and as my husband put it, they “threw me under the bus” when I brought up the upgoing rostering issues & follow up items, which seem to be pretty commonplace long before I arrived.

I cared too much about these issues for  me to enjoy the job outside the actual position and I am most disappointed in myself for this & for bringing it up, with the people I did
but if I hadn’t, I would still be very unhappy with these issues & just lowering my standards to do a less than satisfactory job.

Putting in my resignation was pretty easy when I think about the effect this was having on my life. However, I now have free time – free time as a business owner is a loose term, but a more a relaxed schedule & thinking about the motivation & dedication I am going to need to keep up my training is going to be the toughest part of the whole thing. I had used the job as a great way to push myself & my limits in my running fitness, with the ultimate goal of running from the studio to the post & back.

Still reeling for the shock of all this,  I got up this morning, feeling flat, depressed & unmotivated to push on with my usual Tuesday training schedule which included a CrossFit & pool session followed by some Routine Work & Pole Training at the studio before class. So I have given myself a day to grieve the loss of a job, the new companionships I was starting to create, and to be disappointed in both myself & the company. I will hopefully get motivated enough to map out changes to my training schedule to suit a more relaxed agenda & come up with a game plan to tackle it, but not convinced it will still be achievable on my end, without the added commitment of having to be somewhere.

I am proud of my decision to put my family first & saying “no” to continuing in a role for a company that couldn’t see value in me. Also incredibly grateful to be in a position where I could say “no”, and it not really have that much effect on any part of my life, with the expectation of my training nudge

Written by Leeanne Taylor

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Pole – Rest – Balance

March 27, 2018

So you’ve fallen in love with pole. You’re twirling and flying through the air with grace a few times per week. But don’t forget, the key to long term, healthy progression in pole dance is balance. A balance of rest and hard work, strength and flexibility, and pole and pole-less classes! But how do you choose the right mix of classes?

Most studios now offer a variety of classes designed to work together to help you build strength, fitness, flexibility, dance ability and many other skills, and it is a great idea to take advantage of these as much as possible. Pole requires such a variety of skills, and if abused, can easily create some serious compensations and injuries. By incorporating a variety of classes into your training schedule is not only amazing fun, but will also help you develop as a well rounded, healthy and strong pole dancer.

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A few classes you might consider…

High cardio classes! A huge part of pole is stamina and cardiovascular fitness, though many of us are drawn to pole for its supposed lack of cardio. A student recently put it as bluntly as “I love pole because running sucks”. But love it or hate it, cardio IS important, not only for your life in general but especially to get you through those pole routines you love so much. Whether you take a fitness class like HIIT, maybe a booty boot camp class, or try your hand at a pole grooves style choreography class, any way you can get your cardio fix is great!

Strength classes! Strength and conditioning is an incredibly important part of pole, and building strength in a balanced way is vital to maintain healthy posture and avoid injury. If your studio offers strength and conditioning classes be sure to try some. Taking even one of these classes per week along side your pole classes will greatly improve your performance and help you on your way to a long and prosperous pole “career”.

Stretch classes! Think back to those famous pole dance moves you always remember. Chances are most of them are deeply rooted in flexibility, and even more flexibility than it appears to the untrained eye. Flexibility is also vital to help you avoid injuries throughout your training and to recover faster and more completely.

Dance Classes! It’s no secret pole is hard, and pole routines are possibly the most exhausting 3 minutes of your life! So, a crucial element of every routine, and sometimes the hardest area to put together is the dance. Whether you’ve been a dancer since tiny tots or have never tried choreography without a pole in hand, dance classes are a crucial element of your training. Not only is it incredible fun to try new styles of dance and movement, but the experience will enhance your pole performance more than anything else.

Finding the balance between these and any other classes you may have at your finger tips is a very individual process of trial and error. So do just that, try different classes, try different combinations, and take note of how the mix of classes effects your training, recovery and performance. Maybe you will benefit most from 2 pole classes, a dance and a stretch class. Maybe you need as much focus on flexibility as you do other classes to help you recover. Or maybe you have your classes down pat but need to find the best way to incorporate rest into your schedule. Whatever it is, try to dedicate some serious attention to it, try chatting with your instructors about your future goals and how best to achieve those, and most importantly, avoid comparing yourself to others. This balance is purely about you!

Written by Toni Hearn